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Lower-Mid Level Carver Unit Study

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Outdoor Education

Lower-Middle Level Carver Unit Study

 For ages 6-12

 

Come to the farm and join us for this hands-on outdoor science and nature class.  This unit study uses a variety of methods to introduce STEAM subjects to students as they are introduced to Dr. George Washington Carver.  

 

Students will read interesting books and excerpts, draw, sing, collect items, keep a journal, paint, record data, build, plant and taste.  Use a microscope, record weather data, plant a Carver garden and enjoy the outdoors.  

 

The majority of the items needed for the class will be provided by the farm.  Students will be asked to bring their own composition book and pencils.

 

Fieldtrip fees are not included in the registration fee. 

Lower-Mid Level Classes Dates Thursdays 

September 7, 14, 21, 28=4 meetings

October 5,12, 26=3 meetings

November 2,9,16=3 meetings

December 7,14, 21=3

Total=13 meetings

To register click here.

Here are some of the SC Standards that this cover:

17 GRADE ONE LIFE SCIENCE: PLANTS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS Standard 

1.L.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the structures of plants help them survive and grow in their environments. 

1.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: Plants have specific structures that help them survive, grow, and produce more plants. Plants have predictable characteristics at different stages of development. Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can: 1.L.5A.1 Obtain and communicate information to construct explanations for how different plant structures (including roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and seeds) help plants survive, grow, and produce more plants. 

1.L.5A.2 Construct explanations of the stages of development of a flowering plant as it grows from a seed using observations and measurements. 

1.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: Plants have basic needs that provide energy in order to grow and be healthy. Each plant has a specific environment where it can thrive. There are distinct environments in the world that support different types of plants. These environments can change slowly or quickly. Plants respond to these changes in different ways.

 Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can: 

1.L.5B.1 Conduct structured investigations to answer questions about what plants need to live and grow (including air, water, sunlight, minerals, and space). 

1.L.5B.2 Develop and use models to compare how the different characteristics of plants help them survive in distinct environments (including deserts, forests, and grasslands). 

1.L.5B.3 Analyze and interpret data from observations to describe how changes in the environment cause plants to respond in different ways (such as turning leaves toward the Sun, leaves changing color, leaves wilting, or trees shedding leaves).

GRADE TWO

LIFE SCIENCE: ANIMALS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS

Standard 2.L.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the structures of animals

help them survive and grow in their environments.

2.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: There are many different groups of animals. One way to

group animals by using their physical characteristics. Animals have basic needs that provide for

energy, growth, reproduction, and protection. Animals have predictable characteristics at different stages of development.

2.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: Animals (including humans) require air, water, food, and

shelter to survive in environments where these needs can be met. There are distinct environments in the world that support different types of animals. Environments can change  slowly or quickly. Animals respond to these changes in different ways.

Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

2.L.5B.1 Obtain and communicate information to describe and compare how animals interact with other animals and plants in the environment.

2.L.5B.2 Develop and use models to exemplify characteristics of animals that help them survive

in distinct environments (such as salt and freshwater, deserts, forests, wetlands, or polar

lands).

2.L.5B.3 Analyze and interpret data from observations to describe how animals respond to

changes in their environment (such as changes in food availability, water, or air).

2.L.5B.4 Construct scientific arguments to explain how animals can change their environments

(such as the shape of the land or the flow of water).

GRADE THREE

LIFE SCIENCE: ENVIRONMENTS AND HABITATS

Standard 3.L.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the characteristics and

changes in environments and habitats affect the diversity of organisms.

3.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: The characteristics of an environment (including physical

characteristics, temperature, availability of resources, or the kinds and numbers of organisms

present) influence the diversity of organisms that live there. Organisms can survive only in

environments where their basic needs are met. All organisms need energy to live and grow. This energy is obtained from food. The role an organism serves in an ecosystem can be described by the way in which it gets its energy.

Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

3.L.5A.1 Analyze and interpret data about the characteristics of environments (including salt and

fresh water, deserts, grasslands, forests, rain forests, and polar lands) to describe how the

environment supports a variety of organisms.

3.L.5A.2 Develop and use a food chain model to classify organisms as producers, consumers, and decomposers and to describe how organisms obtain energy.

3.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: When the environment or habitat changes, some plants and

animals survive and reproduce, some move to new locations, and some die. Fossils can be used to infer characteristics of environments from long ago.

Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

3.L.5B.1 Obtain and communicate information to explain how changes in habitats (such as those that occur naturally or those caused by organisms) can be beneficial or harmful to the

organisms that live there.

3.L.5B.2 Develop and use models to explain how changes in a habitat cause plants and animals to respond in different ways (such as hibernating, migrating, responding to light, death, or

extinction).

GRADE FOUR

LIFE SCIENCE: CHARACTERISTICS AND GROWTH OF ORGANISMS

Standard 4.L.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the structural

characteristics and traits of plants and animals allow them to survive, grow, and reproduce.

4.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: Scientists have identified and classified many types of plants and animals. Each plant or animal has a unique pattern of growth and development called a life cycle. Some characteristics (traits) that organisms have are inherited and some result from interactions with the environment.

Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

4.L.5A.1 Obtain and communicate information about the characteristics of plants and animals to

develop models which classify plants as flowering or nonflowering and animals as

vertebrate or invertebrate.

4.L.5A.2 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to compare the stages of development of different seed plants.

4.L.5A.4 Construct scientific arguments to support claims that some characteristics of organisms are inherited from parents and some are influenced by the environment.

4.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: Plants and animals have physical characteristics that allow

them to receive information from the environment. Structural adaptations within groups of plants

and animals allow them to better survive and reproduce.

4.L.5B.2 Construct explanations for how structural adaptations (such as the types of roots, stems, or leaves; color of flowers; or seed dispersal) allow plants to survive and reproduce.

GRADE FIVE

LIFE SCIENCE: INTERDEPENDENT RELATIONSHIPS IN ECOSYSTEMS

5.L.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data to summarize the abiotic factors (including quantity of light

and water, range of temperature, salinity, and soil composition) of different terrestrial

ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems.

5.L.4A.2 Obtain and communicate information to describe and compare the biotic factors

(including individual organisms, populations, and communities) of different terrestrial

and aquatic ecosystems.

5.L.4B. Conceptual Understanding: All organisms need energy to live and grow. Energy is

obtained from food. The role an organism serves in an ecosystem can be described by the way in

which it gets its energy. Energy is transferred within an ecosystem as organisms produce, consume,

or decompose food. A healthy ecosystem is one in which a diversity of life forms are able to meet

their needs in a relatively stable web of life.

Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

5.L.4B.1 Analyze and interpret data to explain how organisms obtain their energy and classify an organisms as producers, consumers (including herbivore, carnivore, and omnivore), or

decomposers (such as fungi and bacteria).

5.L.4B.2 Develop and use models of food chains and food webs to describe the flow of energy in an ecosystem.

5.L.4B.3 Construct explanations for how organisms interact with each other in an ecosystem

(including predators and prey, and parasites and hosts).

5.L.4B.4 Construct scientific arguments to explain how limiting factors (including food, water,

space, and shelter) or a newly introduced organism can affect an ecosystem.

Grade Six

6.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: The Plant Kingdom consists of organisms that primarily make their own food (autotrophs) and are commonly classified based on internal structures that function in the transport of food and water. Plants have structural and behavioral adaptations that increase the chances of reproduction and survival in changing environments. Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:

6.L.5B.1 Construct explanations of how the internal structures of vascular and nonvascular plants transport food and water.

6.L.5B.2 Analyze and interpret data to explain how the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration work together to meet the needs of plants.

6.L.5B.3 Develop and use models to compare structural adaptations and processes that flowering plants use for defense, survival and reproduction.

6.L.5B.4 Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine how changes in environmental factors (such as air, water, light, minerals, or space) affect the growth and development of a flowering plant.

6.L.5B.5 Analyze and interpret data to describe how plants respond to external stimuli (including temperature, light, touch, water, and gravity)

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